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odditiesoflife:

Recycled Animal Art
Driven by a combination of her passion for fitting odd shapes together and a sympathy toward discarded objects, Japanese artist, Sayaka Ganz creates animals from thrift store plastics. She only select objects that have been used and discarded. She believes the best way for artists to help reduce waste is to show how beautiful the materials can be and what can be done with them.


Awesome visioning!
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odditiesoflife:

Recycled Animal Art

Driven by a combination of her passion for fitting odd shapes together and a sympathy toward discarded objects, Japanese artist, Sayaka Ganz creates animals from thrift store plastics. She only select objects that have been used and discarded. She believes the best way for artists to help reduce waste is to show how beautiful the materials can be and what can be done with them.

Awesome visioning!

chrisroberson:

ramonvillalobos:

So I did this drawing of a very Mexican Punisher (El Castigador) and I hope somebody likes it because I  kinda do. Like, If i didn’t do this, I’d think “That’s pretty nice.” I’d probably like it then reblog it. Anyways  it reminds me of hot sauce packaging or something. If you’re interested in a shirt or a print or something, I posted it at Society 6.  Thanks.

This is GORGEOUS.

This is great artwork! Love the concept!

A Passive God?

I continue to confront the issue of “where is God when we suffer”. It came up yesterday in conversation with a friend. It came up in the sermon at church today. Where is God when bad things happen? When the bombs explode in Boston or when the fertilizer plant explodes?

At a staff meeting this week we looked at Psalm 23, “The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want…” Someone said in regard to it that it’s nice to know God walks with us when we go through our valleys of death. That observation rang hollow for me. It came across as a God who simply sidles up to us during tremendous suffering and says “there, there”. It’s not very helpful.

In Sunday School we are studying the play “Wit”, about a professor of John Donne’s Holy Sonnets who has cancer and undergoes extreme treatment. Throughout the play, in her worst moments, people ask her “how are you feeling?” when it’s plain to see she is feeling god awful. It’s an awkward nicety, the question. That’s what it feels like to say God walks with us through the dark times- like someone who can plainly see how we are really doing and asks the banal question anyway. I don’t want a God like that.

Perhaps asking “where’ is God when we suffer is the wrong question. God is here, with us. So what. “What is God DOING when we suffer” is for me the more accurate question. In the play “Wit”, different people are doing different things in regard to the professor/patient. Vivian is suffering- some treat her formally, some treat her as a test case, some treat her with kindness, and some see into the very depths of her humanity with compassion. As I talked to my friend yesterday, I told her I didn’t want an impotent God. I want a God who can DO something. The word that came to me during the sermon today was “passive”. I don’t want God to be passive. I want God to be active, a god of action.

"Wit" shows the need for both action and compassion. That each person does what they can for Vivian to help her and to also see her in the midst of that action, really see her. The hero of the play is Susie, the primary nurse. She does what she can for Vivian in the moment and long range, but the best thing she does for Vivian is see her as a human being who is hurting and deserves kindness. The safe veneer of being a professor of poetry is dropped. Or being a test case for "the full dose" of treatment is let go. She is just Vivian. Susie sees that and acts on it.

The 23rd Psalm was sung in church today. I paid attention to the verbs in it: he makes me lie down, he leads me, he restores my soul, you prepare a table, you anoint my head. Even the mention of God’s rod and staff (“they comfort me”) invokes imagery of action. The psalmist is comforted by God’s action on their behalf.

Does God act on our behalf? Acts of justice, acts of mercy? I’m choosing to believe God does. I don’t believe God is passive. I do not believe God has called me to be passive. I am called to acts of justice, acts of mercy. I don’t believe my best actions supersede God’s. St. Paul said we see as in a mirror dimly now. My best actions are just a pale reflection of God’s actions in this world. I choose to believe God is at work in this world. That when we suffer, God does act on our behalf. I choose to believe the Lord is my Shepherd.

shelligator:

We (meaning Braden Lamb and Shelli Paroline) will be at Boston Comic Con this weekend.

You can find us beneath the big orange banner (booth #203), where we’ll have lots of exciting stuff…

  • A Boston-exclusive Adventure Time print
  • Original art from the AT comic issue #15, which will be going up on ebay this weekend
  • Commission a sketch from us on a blank cover of the AT comic
  • Check out some of the other comics we’ve worked on. They’re at least as good as the AT comic.

Come see our panel at 12pm on Saturday. We’ll be there with the My Little Pony comic’s Andy Price.

If you’re interested in getting stuff signed, we’d be happy to do that for you at the Boom! Studios booth at 3pm on Saturday and Sunday.

Stop by and say hi! Or ask us what time it is! (It will be Adventure Time) We’d love to see you there!

beingblog:

“No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise for the writer, no surprise for the reader. For me the initial delight is in the surprise of remembering something I didn’t know I knew. I am in a place, in a situation, as if I had materialized from cloud or risen out of the ground. There is a glad recognition of the long lost and the rest follows. Step by step the wonder of unexpected supply keeps growing. The impressions most useful to my purpose seem always those I was unaware of and so made no note of at the time when taken, and the conclusion is come to that like giants we are always hurling experience ahead of us to pave the future with against the day when we may want to strike a line of purpose across it for somewhere.”

~Robert Frost from The Robert Frost Reader: Poetry and Prose

Photo by Stan Wiechers / Flickr, cc by-sa 2.0

Love Robert Frost. Love the typewriter.

What moves men of genius, or rather what inspires their work, is not new ideas, but their obsession with the idea that what has already been said is still not enough.
Eugene Delacroix, The Artist’s Way page 182
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